BEYOND FIVE IN A ROW STUDY: Childhood of Famous Americans: Neil Armstrong by Montrew Dunham.

Also used in the study was Dinah Zike's book Great Science Adventures: The World of Space.

The boys had a wonderful time doing these studies. We used a double file folder lapbook to showcase all their wonderful work. A double file folder is created by glueing two folders back to back. They were both folded using a shutter fold. "

The boys studied Neil Armstrong but they also studied The Wright Brothers, Robert Goddard, Chuck Yeager, Galileo, Newton, and Copernicus. They wrote several reports. They are displayed in the lapbook using various forms such as the mini book, layered book, pocket book, and matchbook.One assignment was to write poetry about a famous scientist. Here are the poems that they wrote.

The Wright Brothers by Charlie SchatzleTwo brothers, like Will and I, had an idea that they could fly. On a hill in Kitty Hawk, up in the sky, they did walk.

Breaking the Sound Barrier by William Schatzle Mr. Yeager, all alone. Bell X-1 was what he had flown. Raced the sound barrier, made it crack. Then Neil Armstrong gave it a whack!

Vocabulary was done using the mini book form. I don't think that the boys even realized that they were doing vocabulary! This is a great way to get kids to do their vocabulary and if you have boys, like I do, you are bound to have one who writes very, very small. This works great for the mini books!

My husband works in the space industry so we have an abundance of resources here at home and in our area. The boys created a matchbook riddle page about their dad. It was really cute. Their dad is also the Squadron Commander for Civil Air Patrol at the local Aif Force base. He discussed with the boys the history of C.A.P. and its program of teaching aerospace and aviation to young men and women. The boys also participated in their second year of the Young Eagles Flight program. We took pictures of their flights and put them in the books.

Bernoulli's Principle of Flight was reported on and featured in a shutter form as was an illustration of the Four Principles of Flight.